Mikhail Blagosklonny in the Fight Against Cancer

Mikhail Blagosklonny is currently a professor of oncology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute a facility that has a multidisciplinary approach that is inclusive of scientist and clinicians working together in consult providing groundbreaking cancer research to help fight cancer. Being a part of this team, Mikhail Blagosklonny has also made it his goal to help find new and innovative ways to fight the battle against cancer though scientific study and research.

Mikhail Blagosklonny is a scientist who researches and studies cancer and aging, he earned his M.D., in internal medicine from First Pavlov State Medical University of St Peterburg. He went on to further receive his PhD in experimental medicine and cardiology from the same university. Prior to accepting the position at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Blagosklonny held the position of associate professor at New York Medical College and then senior scientist at Ordway Research Institute.

Having a genuine desire and passion to research and study various avenues regarding cancer research, there is one potential cancer fighting discovery that stands out to Blagosklonny. Mikhail Blagosklonny is a strong proponent for the use of Rapamycin as a treatment for cancer and life extension. In fact he is considered one of the strongest advocates for the use of Rapamycin in the field of cancer research.

Blagosklonny has written a number of publications. These publications include Aging, where Blagosklonny was editor and chief, Cancer Biology & Therapy and Cell Death & Differentiation. Blagosklonny was associate editor and served on the editorial board for these publications. Mikhail Blagosklonny has published over 300 research articles, book chapters and reviews.

He is also an author of anti-cancer approaches referred to as chemotherapeutic engineering and cell cyclotherapy. Mikhail Blagosklonny’s interests regarding research include underlying mechanisms of aging, anti aging drugs, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, cell cycle, signal transduction, mitosis, apoptosis, and cancer and targeted cancer therapies that do not damage normal healthy cells.

Gary